My Wastewater Stinks Like Rotten Eggs

We received a call last week from a company complaining that the wastewater in the collection pit of their wash bay stunk so bad the workers were not wanting to work. They complained that the wash water in the collection pit smelled like rotten eggs. Hydrogen Sulfide Stinks That rotten egg smell is Hydrogen Sulfide gas (H2S).  This gas is produced by what are called anaerobic (no oxygen) bacteria. Anaerobic bacteria can live in the sludge that settles to the bottom of your collection pit. You can often see small bubbles of this gas coming to the top of the ... » Read More

Wash bay design mistake

Don’t Make this Wash Bay Design Mistake

An all too common wash bay design mistake I was recently working at an oil field service company in Houston and needed to walk out in the wash bay. It was a brand new wash bay, everything looked great. But I couldn’t believe it, the floor was slippery as an ice rink. I could barely walk across the floor. The construction contractor had put a smooth polished concrete finish on the wash bay floor. Add water, soap and the grease from the parts being washed and the floor turned into a slippery mess. The entire wash bay was a gigantic ... » Read More

Wash Bay Odor Problems?

Does the water in your wash bay have a strong offensive odor? Is it especially noticeable after a period of inactivity such as Monday morning? What causes Wash bay Odor problems? Odor is usually from bacteria in the water under what is called anaerobic conditions (no oxygen). When those conditions exist the anaerobic bacteria produce Hydrogen Sulfide gas, and that gas smells like rotten eggs. This is usually most notable in the summer time when its warm or after a weekend when the water sits and becomes stagnate. How Do I Control Wash Bay Odor Problems? Manual Odor Controls: Visit your ... » Read More

Selecting the Right Wash Bay Wastewater Treatment Equipment

Getting Started First review your local city and county regulations for the limits set on fat, oil, and grease that can be discharged. Take a sample of your wastewater and have it analyzed for the list of parameters in your local sewer regulations. Compare your sample results with the local limits, you may not need any treatment at all. Keep your analytical data on hand just in case you need it and resample annually or at the frequency required in your local regulations. Wastewater that doesn’t meet your local limits for fat, oil, grease or any other parameter cannot be ... » Read More