Granular Activated Carbon GAC

Which Chemicals Will Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) Adsorb?  A Quick Reference Guide.

I get asked all the time about specific chemicals and the probability of being adsorbed by Granular Activated Carbon.   Below is a quick reference guide.   Always ask your carbon supplier for the GAC Adsorption  isotherm for the chemical you want to remove.  The GAC Isotherm will show you the mg of chemical adsorbed per mg of GAC at constant temperature.   Also, bench scale testing is important as certain adsorption rates are affected by pH, soaps and by the presence of Chelating Compounds such as EDTA. Group 1: Chemicals readily adsorbed by Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) GAC commonly used to remove ... » Read More

Waste Water Treatability Testing with Clay Based Flocculants

A printing company in the Dallas area had a wastewater problem. The city of Dallas does not allow dye or inks that discolor the waste water and issued a Notice of Violation stating that the waste water must be pre-treated before discharge to the sewer or to stop the discharge. The company stopped the discharge and began to have waste water hauled off site for disposal. At the same time an internet search for treating options was conducted. Wilson Environmental was contacted and we offered to do a free treatability test. Our treatability test is simply a yes or no ... » Read More

Package Plants for RV Parks and New Home Developments in Texas

Planning to build homes or an RV Park on your property? Don’t have access to city sewer? Better check out the state permit requirements for your planned development first. Sewage treatment for RV parks or residential developments in Texas is explained below. A permit known as a TPDES (Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) Permit is required to discharge any treated waste water or treated sewage to any body of water in the state of Texas. That includes rivers, lakes, streams and even dry creeks. The permitting process is a two-step process. Step 1 Step 1 is to request what is ... » Read More

Wash bay design mistake

Don’t Make this Wash Bay Design Mistake

An all too common wash bay design mistake I was recently working at an oil field service company in Houston and needed to walk out in the wash bay. It was a brand new wash bay, everything looked great. But I couldn’t believe it, the floor was slippery as an ice rink. I could barely walk across the floor. The construction contractor had put a smooth polished concrete finish on the wash bay floor. Add water, soap and the grease from the parts being washed and the floor turned into a slippery mess. The entire wash bay was a gigantic ... » Read More